China is leading the clean economy race

“Creating a clean economy will not be easy. It will require sustained, consistent, and large-scale investment across many sectors, including transportation, building systems and appliances, energy generation, and of course the electric grid itself. … As a percentage of GDP, China, Germany, and even Brazil are investing at a rate three times greater than the U.S. …

“China is … making longer-term, sustained commitments that are much larger. The country is already in the process of building 16,000 miles of high-speed rail (roughly 16,000 more than the U.S.). And China is bringing together 16 state-run companies to put one million electric cars on the road within a few years. …

“As an indication of how serious China really is, the country has built the largest solar and wind production industries in the world in just a few years. …

“But it was the country’s ten-year plan that made some jaws drop. Between now and 2020, the country will invest 5 trillion yuan in the clean economy. That works out to about $75 to $100 billion per year for 10 years running (smart grid investment alone is estimated at $60 to $100 billion over the next decade). Imagine the U.S. Congress passing the equivalent of the highly controversial stimulus package 10 times over (not likely).”

CU-Boulder to rely less on print brochures for admissions (Boulder Daily Camera) via @bmcnulty

“MacLennan said the 24-page viewbooks that are sent to 120,000 high school seniors will be trimmed in size and will point prospective students and their families to Web sites for more information. He said his office will send out the brochures earlier in the year so the university can pay bulk postage rates. And the school is scaling back on its smaller general brochures that are sent to high school juniors and cost up to $100,000 a year.”

Saving Hog Island (Down East)

“The loss of Hog Island’s bird program would likely close the book on one of the country’s most storied and venerable nature camps. Its birth predates the modern environmental movement by the better part of a century, to a time when few Americans had much sympathy for nature and even fewer realized that it was being undone by the excesses of the industrial age.”

University of Wisconsin Thinks Century Gothic Font Can Help Save the Earth (DailyFinance)

“A 2009 Princeton Review survey found that 68% of students are interested in information on the environmental friendliness of colleges they’re considering, and 26% said that a college’s environmental responsibility would “very much” impact their decision to apply or attend. In 2008, The Princeton Review began ranking colleges in order of green-friendliness based on three broad criteria: “whether the school’s students have a campus quality of life that is healthy and sustainable, how well the school is preparing its students for employment and citizenship in a world defined by environmental challenges, and the school’s overall commitment to environmental issues.” … Iin 2009, 15 schools achieved a perfect score. Among the leaders were Bates College, Binghamton University, Colorado College, Northeastern University, Georgia Tech, Harvard and Yale.?

Green Rating (Princeton Review)

“66% of respondents overall (and 68% of students vs. 59% of parents) said they would value having information about a college’s commitment to the environment – a 4% increase from last year’s respondents. Among that cohort, 24% of respondents overall (26% of students vs. 18% of parents) said such information would “very much” impact their (their child’s) decision to apply to or attend the school.”

Infernal Landscapes – Lens Blog (NYTimes.com)

“Lu Guang the dark social and environmental consequences of China’s modern industrial revolution … ‘Because China’s economy is moving so fast, the pollution is incredibly severe … As I became aware of the pollution as China opened up the western area, I felt that people needed to know about this.'”